entertainment weekly

Okay. Everyone else can stop taking pictures of celebrities now. This is the greatest portrait ever taken. Apex photo achieved. 

entertainment weekly

Okay. Everyone else can stop taking pictures of celebrities now. This is the greatest portrait ever taken. Apex photo achieved. 

(via bloodmunster)

loudest-subtext-in-television:

deducingbbcsherlock:

ivyblossom:

I can’t wait to publish this fic I’m working on at the moment. I genuinely can’t. I’m so excited about it. It’s so much fun! There is so much pining! There is so much angst! And I have a co-conspirator for a change! How much fun is that?

(Can I tell them, loudest-subtext-in-television? Do you…

petition for ivyblossom and loudest-subtext to release more teaser trailers 

please

Petition granted:

But John dying will become a music box in your mind palace. You’ll compose only a few bars before you have to shut it away in there, knowing where those thoughts are headed — where you’re headed — and then you’ll rarely open it. You’ll never wind it either, but that’s no obstacle for an imaginary music box: in your moments of despair it will play anyway. You’ll tear the key out and still it will play. So you’ll tell yourself, in a voice quite like Mycroft’s, that you can’t afford moments of despair. You’ve had a whole table for your plot to kill Moriarty, and the box will come to rest on the corner. You’ll make sure nothing can touch it. You’ll give the rest of the table your attention, and you’ll shift knick-knacks around a taxidermied fox until you can almost forget what lies just outside your peripheral vision.”

second person future tense represent

I’m not sure we can do many teaser trailers because it’s probably not quite long enough for that, but there you go!

WEIRD FIC FOR THE WIN

*rubs hands together with evil glee*

Q

Anonymous asked:

Hello Ivy... I'm intrigued by this scene in The Sign of Three when John and Sherlock end up in jail. We John sitting on the floor and Sherlock on the "bed"/mattress. If they fell asleep together at the stairs, with practically no distance at all between them, why do you think they didn't share the mattress in jail? Was John trying to be romantic and let Sherlock have the bed, or was it something else? I mean, in this episode we see them sleeping together twice, why the change in the second time?

A

I genuinely think the only reason they don’t share it is because they can’t. It’s really wee, it’s barely a bench. They wouldn’t both fit, especially when stonking drunk. I don’t think sharing it was an option, frankly.

I think it was quite gallant of John to let Sherlock take the bed, such as it is. But he always would, regardless, wouldn’t he. Lovely John.

Narratively, they sort of have to end up in jail that night, don’t they. Because if they didn’t, something else would have gone on between them. They were that close to it. And  if that had happened, I’m sure John would have had to call off his wedding.

What a beautiful close call!

Q

Anonymous asked:

Hello, Ivy! I am a big fan of your stories. I was just wondering, while speaking of Gatiss and Moffat: which one of them do you think is so-to-say more responsible for John as a character and which one is for Sherlock? And as writers are sometimes believed to write primarily about themselves (whatever this implies), who of the two of 'Sherlock' writers would you impersonate / associate with John and who - with Sherlock? Sorry if it's a weird question, please feel free to ignore it. :)

A

What you’re describing is, to my mind, roleplaying. That’s a fairly unusual way to write fiction.

When Mark Gatiss has the writing credit, he is responsible for everything John says and does and everything Sherlock says and does for the duration of that episode. When Stephen Thompson has the writing credit, ditto for him. They don’t slice it up by character, they slice it up by episode, as far as we can tell. In TEH, you’re seeing Mark Gatiss’s interpretation of Sherlock. In HLV, you’re seeing Steven Moffat’s. I’d be very, very surprised to learn that one of these writers is the supreme authority on any character.

A writer isn’t just the one character. The writer is producing a story, after all, not just a single character. The writer is the lady across the street annoyed by the noise, the temperature of the room, the ringing phone, the villain, the love interest, the best friend, the parents, the mean babysitter from years ago who gave the protagonist that weird scar on his calf, the wallpaper, the boiling kettle, the impending rain, and the protagonist, all at the same time. Writers only write about themselves? Bah! That’s nonsense!

It would be cool if they had character bibles for the Sherlock characters, though. Notes and details that describe the essential Sherlockness of Sherlock and Johnness of John, all the details and backstory and future decisions that colour how they each write them and keep them pointed in the same direction from episode to episode. All the secrets would be in there. the things these characters feel but don’t say. The goals they have that they don’t admit to. I’d like them to have character bibles like that mostly because then I could potentially steal them and read them. But that’s just the fantasy.

Q

Anonymous asked:

What are your thoughts on Steven Moffat?

A

I am a fan. I love the complexity and structure of his stories. Blink is fucking brilliant. I love The Empty Child. I love the concept of Jack Harkness. I love Coupling. I absolutely adore A Scandal in Belgravia. I haven’t seen Press Gang yet, but I hear very good things. I love his characters and how he writes them. I love the core of deep emotion at the heart of pretty much everything he puts on a screen. I love his snappy dialogue. I love that he lies in interviews. I love his generous approach to fandom and fanfiction, and his words of encouragement and support for fan writers has brought me to tears. I wish I knew him personally so I could tell you what I think of him as a human being, but we haven’t been formally introduced, so I can’t comment on that. If I were ever in a situation where I got myself formally introduced to Steven Moffat, I’d hope a hug would be offered early on, because I would really like to hug him.

I wish he would let me buy him a pint. Or three, because I’d like to have a long chat with him.

I can’t wait to publish this fic I’m working on at the moment. I genuinely can’t. I’m so excited about it. It’s so much fun! There is so much pining! There is so much angst! And I have a co-conspirator for a change! How much fun is that?

(Can I tell them, loudest-subtext-in-television? Do you think they can handle the incredible volume of Johnlockery we are going to unleash on the world? I’m a bit worried that the intensity of our combined shippiness will first implode, and then explode in a shower of smart knitwear, rainbows, smiley faces, tea, top hats, and cocaine. But only time will tell.)

Sunday Six

That’s how you’ll end up with a hand on his waist, resting on the small of his back, hidden under his coat. His skin will feel invitingly warm. That will be the first time it will occur to you that something else might be going on between you and him.

You’ll blush hard, just thinking it, like you are now. You’ll blush because there are far too many idle thoughts and unacknowledged fantasies in your head that start this way, and you’ll be too drunk to untangle them from reality, from this moment. You won’t let go of him, because you won’t want to.

Bucket List of subjects I hope to write stories about someday:

  • time travel;
  • neanderthals;
  • nuns;
  • oblates;
  • main character death in a first person story;
  • the plague;
  • a mass extinction event;
  • trains;
  • the fact that you could conceivably get an audio track off of anything made on a pottery wheel;
  • hallucinations;
  • Moses;
  • Sodom and Gomorrah;
  • telegraph operators;
  • virtual world/physical world merging;
  • a clone of Teresa of Avila;
  • assassins with doctorates in philosophy and/or literature.

Also, I’d like to write an epistolary novel.

What would be truly impressive would be story containing all of these. That would be a tale for the ages.

Sitting on the top level of the double-decker bus this afternoon on the way home for Easter. I love these tights. I feel life is too short not to wear these tights.

So far: three glasses of white wine in the sunshine with my mother and now a pint of porter while watching Upstairs Downstairs. That’s how a family of atheists celebrate Easter, apparently.

Q

jayez-fanfiction asked:

Hi :) I have to admit I never finished any of your Sherlock stories since I have never felt comfortable with first person POV, neither writing nor reading it (I love your blog, though!). I was wondering why you prefer writing in first person? Do you have any thoughts on the reasons behind this? Best wishes from Berlin!

A

My blog is also written in first person. Eek!

I do indeed have thoughts about why I write stories in first person. I have written many many words on the subject in the past. The choice of narrative perspective has to do with what kind of story you’re aiming to tell, and it just so happens that I have chosen to write the kinds of stories that benefit from a first person perspective. It resonates with me personally, as my interest in stories revolves mostly around people and their subjective views and interpretations. I am very much interested in voice and how you can use it to shape a story. Since I have no visual imagination, I prefer to use a strong voice to colour a story rather than visual descriptions.

My German is very rusty, so I’m not sure what the state of German literature is at the moment, but if you dislike first person narratives, there is a very large swath of English literature from which you are barring yourself. Including Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes stories, notably. But hey, none of us have to read everything. We’ve all got to filter somehow.

My presumption, given the way you’ve framed this question, is that you want to know why I would choose to write something in such a hateful way that loses the attention of good readers like yourself. So let me be clear: I don’t write anything with the hope of attracting the maximum number of readers. I don’t write based on statistical probability of mass popularity. I write what I want to write. I write what I love. I write what I am driven to write, in the way I am driven to write it. I write in first person because I absolutely fucking love it. Obviously you have a different perspective.

Hey, if you hate first person present tense, wait till you see what I’m working on now! It’s in second person future tense. You’re going to loathe it!

The advantage of the gift economy fandom world, as opposed to the pro writing commercial world, is that I don’t have to care what the majority wants. I get to just write what I want. This is the greatest blessing ever to me, because I don’t want to be constrained by other people’s quirks and desires, or what most people want to read. I am not most people, I am me! I want to write my stories my way!

You know, “I hate first person, why do you write in first person?” is not unlike saying, “I hate your girlfriend, why are you dating your girlfriend?” Obviously we have a difference of opinion. That’s the easy answer. Because I like it (her), even though you don’t. We have different tastes, that’s what. Art (and taste in girlfriends) is obviously subjective. The human community is filled with diversity, and that’s a wonderful thing, isn’t it?

Let’s play a game. How many digits do you think you could fit into Cumberbatch’s nostrils? Obviously it depends on the digits, but four is the bare minimum (obviously).

(via myseestershotme)

Q

vulcansmirk asked:

oh shit 4th person?? ? is that a joke or is it actually a thing? that sounds so cool alskdgh

A

angiefsutton replied to your post: anonymous asked:Your Sherlock sto…

Okay - I have to ask: what’s 4th person? ;-)

twotwoonebeemine replied to your post: anonymous asked:Your Sherlock sto…

I just want to know what 4th person is. This will bug me all day.

One should know that the fourth person is often ambiently present when using bizarrely twisted sentences directed at no one in particular. As one does.