Sherlock Holmes is, if nothing else, odd-looking. He is a truly weird collection of physical characteristics that by rights shouldn’t work, but do. He’s all angles, for a start. He has small, sharp eyes. He’s a bit old-fashioned looking, a bit out of place. His hands are too big, his arms don’t seem to fit properly. His neck is too long. His waist is tiny. He’s skinny. His face is long and thin, intense and tightly controlled, but his hair plays paradox and is shiny, joyful, and out of control. Physically, it’s like he doesn’t make sense. But you can’t take your eyes off him. You can’t figure out how he works, and you want to try. You can only imagine that some part of him rests in another dimension, just outside of your range of vision, making him so oddly beautiful. You want to touch him, but you know you can’t.
John Watson, on the other hand, is perfect. Perfectly normal, perfectly ordinary, the golden ratio of a man. His eyes, nose, and mouth fit perfectly into his face. His hands are precisely the size and shape they should be: his torso is neither too long, nor too short. He is the platonic ideal of a man, a Vitruvian man. You can tell by looking at him that, if you measured his outstretched arms, you would also be calculating his height, down to the last inch. He is so perfectly in proportion that he easy to overlook. When he walks he is perfectly stable, because his legs are the perfect length for his body, and so he has a perfect stride. He does not stomp, lose his balance, or stumble. If you aim for where his heart ought to be, you won’t miss, because where his heart is supposed to be is precisely where it is. John Watson is the most perfectly ordered man you can imagine. Misjudge him, and he might kill you.

Sherlock Holmes is, if nothing else, odd-looking. He is a truly weird collection of physical characteristics that by rights shouldn’t work, but do. He’s all angles, for a start. He has small, sharp eyes. He’s a bit old-fashioned looking, a bit out of place. His hands are too big, his arms don’t seem to fit properly. His neck is too long. His waist is tiny. He’s skinny. His face is long and thin, intense and tightly controlled, but his hair plays paradox and is shiny, joyful, and out of control. Physically, it’s like he doesn’t make sense. But you can’t take your eyes off him. You can’t figure out how he works, and you want to try. You can only imagine that some part of him rests in another dimension, just outside of your range of vision, making him so oddly beautiful. You want to touch him, but you know you can’t.

John Watson, on the other hand, is perfect. Perfectly normal, perfectly ordinary, the golden ratio of a man. His eyes, nose, and mouth fit perfectly into his face. His hands are precisely the size and shape they should be: his torso is neither too long, nor too short. He is the platonic ideal of a man, a Vitruvian man. You can tell by looking at him that, if you measured his outstretched arms, you would also be calculating his height, down to the last inch. He is so perfectly in proportion that he easy to overlook. When he walks he is perfectly stable, because his legs are the perfect length for his body, and so he has a perfect stride. He does not stomp, lose his balance, or stumble. If you aim for where his heart ought to be, you won’t miss, because where his heart is supposed to be is precisely where it is. John Watson is the most perfectly ordered man you can imagine. Misjudge him, and he might kill you.

(via emmagrant01)

Q

Anonymous asked:

Do you have any advice for people who over think each step, are incredibly insecure and perfectionist when writing?

A

I could try. I’m not sure my advice will be very helpful, though.

I’m very loath to use the term “overthink” ever, under any circumstances. I struggle to think of a circumstance when lots of thought isn’t a good thing. But it’s got to result in something. Thought should lead to decisions; maybe frame your thinking in terms of making decisions. Thought is a good way to generate possibilities. That’s always good.

I certainly understand insecurity. I think the only way to really address it is to face it head on. What are you insecure about, specifically? I have a list of things I think I’m not very good at, and I am progressively working through the list trying to improve my abilities in those things. If you fear you might not be good at something, get better at it, that’s what I figure. Humans are learning animals. We evolved to get better at doing things. Practice goes a long way. There’s basically nothing you can’t learn. That may not be useful advice, I dunno. 

I am not a perfectionist, so I’m probably not the best person to give advice to perfectionists. I part ways with the concept of “perfect” very early on. I’m not sure what it means, to be honest. Especially when it comes to art. “Perfect” suggests there is one way to do something, and that’s not true. Good art is quirky and subjective, and can only be done the way you do it by you. I understand “the best I can do,” but I don’t understand “perfect.” How do you know when you’ve got there? Who’s qualified to judge? 

9 times out of 10 the best part of a post is the joke is in the tags.

littlelock:

Mostly what I want to know is why John looks down. Is he so used to being deduced that he thinks maybe Wiggins is right about the chafing? Is he thinking, I’m chafing? Really? Looking down at his jeans isn’t going to answer the question, but it’s like he thinks it might. And he needs Sherlock to tell him that Wiggins is wrong. About his own thighs. 

And then John realizes he’s looking at his crotch. And so is everyone else.

And then everyone in the room realizes that John is massively well-endowed. Here we are, all of us together, examining John’s crotch, and noting that, oh yes, that’s why he walks like that. 

John’s crotch of majesty befuddles even the most observant of men.

(via obscure-affection)

More questions, this time from moranion. I’m not very good at the second half of this, which involves tagging people. Later. LATER!

1. What was your last nightmare about?

Not a nightmare per se, but an anxiety dream. I was back in London for a 24 hour period and I needed to accomplish a set of very important tasks, including, most importantly of all, getting a gigantic cream-filled donut on Portobello Rd. I was worried that that critical task might not get done, and that all hell would break loose (obviously) if I didn’t get my hands on that donut.

2. Which book do you think we all need to read before we die?

Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ’s Childhood Pal.

3. Same question as above, but which movie?

Primer.

4. When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?

A writer. Also: independently wealthy.

5. Best comfort food?

Anything dominated by cheese.

6. Which is that one song that’s so good it makes you want to cry and laugh at the same time?

We Built This City, Jefferson Starship.

7. Do you have a favourite piece of art? What is it?

All of these. Also this, for some reason.

8. Are you afraid of dying?

Yes.

9. What was your first kiss like?

I don’t really remember, to be honest. It was a long time ago. I think it was awkward. I hadn’t decided yet if it was really such a good idea. It was someone who had been arrested for break & enter several already and he was only fifteen. #knowshowtopickem

10. Do you like yourself? 

I don’t know. We’ve never been properly introduced.

queersherlockian:

in which ivyblossom and flawedamythyst run perf game

Twitter is where we keep all our idle snark thoughts.

rules:

  • Rule 1: post the rules
  • Rule 2: answer the questions the person who tagged you asked and write 11 new ones
  • Rule 3: tag 11 people and link them to the post
  • Rule 4: actually tell them you tagged them

Questions from tearstainedashes:

1. What was the last thing you had to eat?

A blackberry. Not a phone, obvs, we don’t eat those in Canada. An actual berry. I really like blackberries. Oops, I just had another. And another. Mmmm blackberries.

2. Who was your first celebrity crush?

Michael Jackson. It was 1982.

3. What is your phone background (homescreen, lockscreen, or both)?

My homescreen/lockscreen is Fishing Boats on the Beach at Saintes-Maries by Van Gogh. 

4. What is your favorite dessert?

I don’t really have a favourite. I really like vanilla, though. Perhaps unsurprisingly. Real vanilla. 

5. Do you have any pets?

Not at the moment. I respect cats, but I adore dogs. Ask rileyo.

6. Favorite Disney movie?

Mary Poppins. Though I have a soft spot for The Rescuers and The Fox and the Hound.

7. If you could be best friends with any Marvel superhero, who would it be and why?

I’m not that familiar with the Marvel universe. But Batgirl, probably. We’re both librarians, we might get on. Unless she’s one of those librarians. (Edited to add: And Batgirl isn’t even a Marvel character. That’s how well I know my superheroes. I rest my case.)

8. Shakespeare: yay or nay?

Yay!

9. Have you ever had a penpal or do you have one now?

I have had, and I do have! loudest-subtext-in-television is my pen friend. We write epic emails to each other. The last email I wrote to her was entirely incoherent because I was mostly asleep, but I think we’re still friends.

10. Are you right- or left-handed?

Left.

11. What is one thing you absolutely have to do before you die?

Hug Steven Moffat.

It’s actually kind of funny that the return of Moriarty is enough to give Sherlock absolution and bring him back from his death-sentence exile. It was Sherlock and Mycroft who were meant to have dealt with Moriarty the last time, and apparently they absolutely failed to do so. You’d think that little group of powerful people making these decisions might have said, “Alright, well, so who else have we got, then? James Bond? Lara Croft? No? It’s just the bumbling Holmes brothers?”

*stern looks all around*

"Well this is a nice pickle we’re in, isn’t it."

tiger-in-the-flightdeck:

inthecornerreading:


“There was a crash as Holmes’s pistol came down on the man’s head. I had a vision of him sprawling upon the floor with blood running down his face while Holmes rummaged him for weapons.”
Illustration by Howard K. Elcock for “The Adventure of the Three Garridebs”, The Strand Magazine, January 1925.

Remember, kids: don’t shoot Watson. Ever.

“It’s nothing, Holmes. It’s a mere scratch.” He had ripped up my trousers with his pocket-knife. “You are right,” he cried with an immense sigh of relief. “It is quite superficial.” His face set like flint as he glared at our prisoner, who was sitting up with a dazed face. “By the Lord, it is as well for you. If you had killed Watson, you would not have got out of this room alive. Now, sir, what have you to say for yourself?”

People will definitely talk now.

tiger-in-the-flightdeck:

inthecornerreading:

“There was a crash as Holmes’s pistol came down on the man’s head. I had a vision of him sprawling upon the floor with blood running down his face while Holmes rummaged him for weapons.”

Illustration by Howard K. Elcock for “The Adventure of the Three Garridebs”, The Strand Magazine, January 1925.

Remember, kids: don’t shoot Watson. Ever.

“It’s nothing, Holmes. It’s a mere scratch.”
He had ripped up my trousers with his pocket-knife.
“You are right,” he cried with an immense sigh of relief. “It is quite superficial.” His face set like flint as he glared at our prisoner, who was sitting up with a dazed face. “By the Lord, it is as well for you. If you had killed Watson, you would not have got out of this room alive. Now, sir, what have you to say for yourself?”

People will definitely talk now.

(via anotherwellkeptsecret)

burnt-oranges replied to your post: salviag replied to your post: “Writ…

question: how do you know if that raw material is bad and whether to feel confident in it or not? that’s something i struggle with

Yeah, me too. That’s why I started exploring ways to pin the story down as a whole, before I wrote it, to get a good look at it. That’s why I’m so big on outlining. I need to get the idea in a form where I can stand back and get a look at the whole thing so I can evaluate it.

Sometimes people talk as if the only way to see and feel a story is to write it all out. I’ve been looking for other ways to do it, and while reading and writing it is probably the closest to it you ever come, I can experience it in other ways as well. At least enough to know whether I’m going down the wrong path.

I write long stories, it’s just my rhythm, but I can’t keep a long story in my head all at once, so I can’t just pore over it inside my head. I need to pin it up to see all of it.

There are many ways to do this, and I keep experimenting with new ones. Post it notes, a long list of events, drawing a graph of rising and falling emotional heft and action, a big, sprawling mind map…whatever fits the project.

I need to pin the story up. Then I look at it and walk myself through it with this bird’s eye view. Then I need to evaluate it the way I would evaluate any story, I guess. Is it just like something else, am I just copying something I like? Is it a series of cliches? Am I repeating the same event over and over? Have I done this before? Does it make sense? Are there plot holes? What are the alternatives? What else could logically happen?

It helps to take someone else through it too, which is another advantage to pinning it up. Someone else can see into your head that way. You can pin a story up and get a beta on that, too, before you’ve agonized over word choices.

That’s the direction I’ve been going, anyway. I don’t know if it’s the best one, but I’ve found it helpful. It certainly makes me more confident in my story by the time I sit down to turn it into words. I find it also makes the writing stage really fast.

todaysdocument:

It’s National Library Week!
Remember being this excited to check out a book? (Maybe you still are.)

From “The Day the Books Went Blank”, a 1961 educational film intended to show the importance of maintaining quality libraries, from The Library Extension Agencies of the six New England States.


The theme of this year’s National Library Week is “Lives Change.”  How has a library, or librarian, changed your life?

todaysdocument:

It’s National Library Week!

Remember being this excited to check out a book? (Maybe you still are.)

From “The Day the Books Went Blank”, a 1961 educational film intended to show the importance of maintaining quality libraries, from The Library Extension Agencies of the six New England States.

The theme of this year’s National Library Week is “Lives Change.”  How has a library, or librarian, changed your life?

(via eccecorinna)

image

salviag replied to your post: "Writing is a two-stage Process."

I may not have read the entire thread, but the part about ‘creative imagination’ and ‘technical imagination’? It’s more of a mindset/approach than a step in the writing process. My guess is that your creative steps are 1 & 4, and the rest technical

I wasn’t referring to this creative/technical split, I was referring to “writing is a two-stage process,” not that.

However, I disagree with your assessment of which parts of my process are creative and which are technical. But then, I might disagree generally with the division of creative and technical in the first place. 

"Writing is a two-stage Process."

I just read that line as part of this thread, and did that screech-to-a-halt thing they do in cartoons. Two stage process? TWO?

Wow. Writing is a six-stage process for me at the moment.

  1. Brainstorming;
  2. Outlining;
  3. Revising my outline;
  4. Writing;
  5. Editing;
  6. Revising based on feedback.

Having worked this way, I have no idea how I could possibly condense it down to only two stages!

Though some years ago, writing was a one stage process for me. 

  1. Write.

How times have changed.